What If I’m Confused About My Compensation Requirements During Salary Negotiations?

Be prepared for your discussions with your new employer. Even though most executive salary negotiations, especially those with six-figure jobs and up benefit from or actually need coaching help, it is still important for you to think out your situation and prepare for salary discussions. At least, you need to bring three numbers into a final job interview:

- Ideal

- Satisfactory

- No-Go

These “name” your salary and frame your negotiation. Your employer probably has his/her own three numbers as well. Good negotiations will find the common ground between you. Excellent negotiations on your part will be at the highest possible point of that common ground.

Let’s say you’re a convention coordinator, and in your present job you’re underpaid at $45,000. And let’s say you’d be ecstatic at $70,000 – a number bigger than you think you’d ever get, but it’s not a complete fantasy – it passes the “laugh test.”

At the other end of the spectrum, there’s no point in moving jobs for less than, say, $50,000. We’ve named the Ideal (top) and the No-go (bottom) numbers. This is my Ninth Commandment of Salary Negotiations: Thou Shalt Not Take the Name of Thy Salary in Vain.

Now let’s look at the employer’s point of view. She is pulling her hair out with the complaints she’s getting with her current coordinator. She’s in danger of losing an entire $150,000 account if she doesn’t get someone [like you] who’s good with attention to detail. She knows that the average salary for a coordinator is $40,000 for a plodder, up to $55,000 for a self-starter. The top of her range is $60,000.

Your common ground, then, is $50,000 – $60,000. That’s $50K for your lowest, and $60K for her highest. Neither of you know that common ground when you start negotiating. All you know is your own range.

There’s a whole negotiating dance that takes place to come to some agreement. The part of that dance I want to emphasize in this commandment is your clarity. Before you begin serious money talk, your top, bottom, and mid-ground numbers need to be thought out. If they are fuzzy, your negotiations will be fuzzy. If you’re not clear that $50,000 is as low as you’ll go, you might waffle. In the heat of the interview, experiencing great rapport, imagining friendly coworkers (not the grouches you work with now) you will be tempted to say, “OK. I’ll start there and work up.”

No! Do not take the name of your salary in vain! “I’m sorry, Ms. Employer. I would love to work here. I feel a great connection. I love your accounts, but somehow we have to reach a minimum of $50,000 and preferably $55. Let’s put our heads together and find a way, shall we?”

Making Lemon-Aid Out of a Lemon PowerPoint Presentation

What do you do if your boss gives you a thoroughly lousy PowerPoint presentation to deliver and it has 50 bullet points on each slide, complicated graphs, and long sentences everywhere?

Don’t panic! In this case, your PowerPoint slides are not going to help your presentation. But they don’t have to hurt you or destroy the presentation either. Here is what I recommend you do in this tough situation:

1. Ask your boss what the desired result is from the speech.

2. Ask your boss what the 5 most important message points he/she wants the audience to remember.

3. Incorporating the info from your boss from the above two questions, go through the long, detail-intensive slides you have been given and select the one (and only one) most important idea from each slide.

4. Prepare to give examples, facts, details and preferably stories that flesh out the one key idea from each story.

5. Resolve that you are not going to read or even cover all of the other points or concepts covered on each slide.

6. Be familiar enough with the facts of the slides to answer questions that relate to them, but double your resolve not to cover every fact of number on the slides.

7. When you flash a slide up, close your mouth and give people a chance to read or absorb what is on it, even if it takes a minute.

8. Have a great opening for a minute or two that gives the audience an interesting and useful piece of information and a reason to listen to you before you show the first slide in your PowerPoint.

9. When you are finishing your presentation, remove your final slide and give a strong and powerful conclusion that is in no way dependent on your slide.

10. Remember, you aren’t really giving a PowerPoint presentation. You are giving a presentation where people are judging your skills, intelligence and long-term potential. So don’t let someone else’s bad PowerPoint handcuff you into giving a bad speech.

You can give a great speech regardless of the slides.

Better Public Speaking – How To Change Your Presentation To Become A Highly-Paid Public Speaker

You can improve your skills as a public speaker by making just a few small changes in what you are already doing. A career in public speaking can be the most highly paid careers in the world and the need for public speakers will always be high. If you have given public speaking a try, but feel you need to improve your presentation or delivery, here are some suggestions that can turn your speaking into a new career.

  • Practice speaking in front of others as often as you can. Just being in front of an audience regularly will help you to improve in a short amount of time.
  • Prepare a speech that will become your signature or keynote speech. This can be a personal story with some helpful information for your audience, or a lesson on how the audience member can do something related to your topic.
  • Prepare a handout to give to the audience members. Depending on your topic and where you will be speaking you may want to ask the audience to answer some questions or fill in the blanks on the handout you give them. Getting the audience to participate is a great way to involve them in what you are speaking about.
  • Be ready to give the audience a website or blog address where they can find out more information about you. This will help you if they ask you a question you are not ready to answer. By the time they visit your site you can include the answer to their question.

I encourage you to learn more about becoming a public speaker from someone who has done it professionally for many years so that you will have a greater chance of becoming a highly paid public speaker.